Eric Sall, Installation Shot, 2019
Eric Sall, Installation Shot, 2019
The Current: Eric Sall Philbrook Museum January 10th - April 12th, 2020 The Current: Eric Sall explores the colorful abstractions of Tulsa-based artist Eric Sall and how a transformative—and performative—event, in which he participated in 2018 augmented his risk-taking in abstract painting. In October of last year, Philbrook and the Tulsa Ballet collaborated to create an innovative, original ballet in which Sall created a live, gestural painting on stage while dancers in black-and-white costumes—created to reflect Sall’s abstract shapes and wave-like marks—spun the painter and his canvas across the stage on a rolling platform. This 22-minute event staged in the Philbrook gardens pushed Sall to experiment with quick-drying acrylics and to extend his practice into the performative realm. Since creating his Pentaptych suite on stage, the artist has turned increasingly toward the use of opaque, hard-edged geometries and images, which he overlays on top of gestural waves of diaphanous color. The Current will combine ballet paintings, costumes, a video of the 2018 event, and newer, large-scale works that energetically weave references to movement, popular culture, textiles, and design. As they walk through the upper level of the Villa Philbrook, visitors will experience this historic and domestically-scaled space like never before, newly enlivened with contemporary paintings inspired by action and dance in the Philbrook gardens.
Tabitha Soren, Surface Tension Tower
Tabitha Soren, Surface Tension Tower
Tabitha Soren Davis Museum at Wellesley February 7th - June 9th, 2019 Tabitha Soren’s Surface Tension intervenes into the cool, disembodied, transactional relationships we conduct with our digital devices—and meddles with the “neutrality” of the information we receive through them. Her subjects are united by a focus on touch, reinstating the haptic as an essential aspect of humanity, and the images carry a charge that is at once familiar and uncanny. Soren shoots iPad screens with an 8 x 10 view camera under raking light to reveal the grime we leave behind—the fingerprints and greasy smears of our embodied selves, so seemingly at odds with the chilly detachment and objectivity of the information that flows towards us, unrelentingly. The photographs are titled simply as urls, bringing viewers back to the “original” of the image while signaling both instantaneity and mediation. Soren’s pictures are rendered with painterly detail, luscious and beautiful, by virtue of the surface mess posed in contrast to the discernible subjects that emerge below. The project is simple, suggestive, and transformational. It not only considers “how people consume, manipulate, dismiss, cherish, interact with image-driven content online—and the relentless layering that accompanies this experience,” but insists that we pause to reconsider too. Curated by Lisa Fischman, Ruth Gordon Shapiro ‘37 Director of the Davis, the exhibition is generously supported by Wellesley College Friends of Art at the Davis, the Alice Gertrude Spink Art Fund (1963), and the Anonymous '70 Endowed Davis Museum Program Fund.
Kim Keever, Abstract 27461,  2016
Kim Keever, Abstract 27461, 2016
Kim Keever Figge Art Museum February 9th - May 12th 2019 The word sublime in art history is often used to refer to scenes whose magnitude and splendor inspire awe and wonder, but also a twinge of fear. Artist Kim Keever manages to create such scenes within the confines of a fish tank. Using his engineering background in fluid dynamics, Kim Keever takes photographs of compositions he creates using various paints and inks added to the water inside a 200-gallon tank to produce compelling atmospheric effects. Through the combination of handmade diorama elements, carefully orchestrated lighting, and the uncontrollable effects created by paints dissipating in the water, a bizarre landscape appears in front of Kim Keever’s lens. The resulting large scale photographs have often been compared to the paintings of the Hudson River School and simultaneously feel like an image of an aquarium, a primordial landscape, and a vision of a post-apocalyptic future. Kim Keever lives and works in New York City. His work can be found in numerous collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Hirshhorn National Museum of Modern Art in Washington DC.
Rachel Hayes, Multimedia Installation, 2018
Rachel Hayes, Multimedia Installation, 2018
Rachel Hayes Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art July 4th - December 30th Hayes’s fabric structures explore color theory, quilting, pattern making and modern design. They often respond to specific sites ranging from outdoor settings to interior architectural spaces. She has been collaborating with Italian fashion house Missoni for a series of installations since 2017. Hayes will take over The CityWay Gallery curated by iMOCA with a floor to ceiling installation similar to current installations at 108 Contemporary and the Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa (OK). “I have created textile panels that reveal and conceal one other, beckoning viewers to walk through the unfolding landscape of textiles, and notice new perspectives through the layers of fabrics,” says Hayes. She hopes to create an intimate moment of personal space within the gallery. Her monolithic works are vibrant with color, supple and looming, yet they yield to touch, and are not meant to intimidate, but embolden.
Eric Sall with the  Tulsa Ballet 2018
Eric Sall with the Tulsa Ballet 2018
Eric Sall Ballet in the Gardens September 14th - 29th Eric will be painting on stage for the first major collaboration between Tulsa Ballet and Philbrook Museum of Art on September 29th. The event will feature new choreography by Ma Cong and Music by Ryan Lott.
Henry Jackson at Seattle Art Fair 2018
Henry Jackson at Seattle Art Fair 2018
Henry Jackson Seattle Art Fair 2018 Henry Jackson will be featured at the Seattle Art Fair with Stewart Gallery dealer, Stephanie Wilde. Work will include both Oil Paintings and works on paper including his painting, Salva, which has been featured at the Palo Alto Art Center's exhibition, Spectral Hues, in 2016.
Kim Keever, Georgia O'Keefe and Contemporary Art at Crystal Bridges
Kim Keever, Georgia O'Keefe and Contemporary Art at Crystal Bridges
Kim Keever Georgia O'Keefe and Contemporary Art May 26th - September 3rd - Crystal Bridges Don’t miss this one-of-a-kind exhibition, developed by and debuting at Crystal Bridges. Featuring paintings, sculptures, works on paper, photographs, site-specific installations and more, in The Beyond, you’ll enjoy the renowned artwork of Georgia O’Keeffe while discovering a new generation of American artists working today.
Ward Schumaker with his publication, Hate is What We Need, 2017
Ward Schumaker with his publication, Hate is What We Need, 2017
Ward Schumaker Book Publication - Hate is What We Need On March 27th, Chronicle Books will release Ward Schumaker's book of paintings titled, "Hate is What We Need". This book translates the political context of our current moment into visceral works of art. Schumaker turns some of Donald Trump’s most egregious statements into emphatic text-based paintings. Hate Is What We Need reminds us that no matter how numb we have become to the constant barrage of vitriol and dishonesty emanating from the current White House, this state of the union is not normal. afterward for Hate Is What We Need I am an artist, a painter––of books. Big, messy, one-of-a-kind hand-painted books. Frequently containing stenciled lettering, sloppy calligraphy, approaching and often accomplishing incomprehensibility. Subject of these books? Beauty, for the most part, but including snippets of spiritual texts, fragments of dreams, and apparently irrelevant and/or inscrutable instructions. Not for the reader in search of plot, betterment, or popular imagery. And nothing political. Never anything political. But then the night of horror arrived, that night in which the world itself became less comprehensible than many of us had previously assumed (and hoped) it to be: the night Donald J. Trump was elected president of the United States. Not with a majority (we all know Hillary won that) but an officially authorized win, nevertheless––a frightening, disheartening, dangerous and destructive win. Since that night, my wife and I have awoken each day with the questions we share with so many: what new horror had Donald committed while we slept, what vile inanity had he voiced, who had become his latest victim? How much closer was the world to nuclear holocaust? My personal vision of Beauty had always seemed sufficient subject for my painting. Living under Trump seems to have changed that. This book is a small effort to respond to Trump's menace: a collection of hard-to-believe, highly regrettable, dangerous, mean-spirited and ill-informed words from the orange-faced comb-over, himself. I am certain to have missed some of your favorites, and I am certain that each week there will be more statements that deserve to be included. All I can answer to that is: Resist.